Cathead Jam 2019

Cathead Jam 2019

The Revivalists, Umphrey's McGee, Greensky Bluegrass, Anderson East, The Wailer's Julian Junior Marvin, Rayland Baxter, Aaron Lee Tasjan, Young Valley

May 31 Friday - Jun 01 Saturday

Doors: 4:00 pm / Show: 6:00 pm

Cathead Distillery

Jackson, MS

$70 Daily GA | $100 Weekend GA | $400 Weekend VIP

Cathead Jam 2019 is a rain or shine event.  NO REFUNDS

 

Artists and schedule subject to change without notice. Artist cancellation is not grounds for refund.

 

Cathead Jam 2019 is Friday, May 31 and Saturday, June 1 at the Cathead Distillery in Jackson, Mississippi!

 

Featuring performances by The Revivalists, Umphrey's McGee, Greensky Bluegrass, Anderson East, The Wailers, Rayland Baxter, and Aaron Lee Tasjan.

Cathead Jam
Cathead Jam
A music festival for Jackson, Mississippi hosted at the Cathead Distillery. Produced by Ardenland.

Celebrating eight years of Cathead Vodka, Cathead Jam 2019 is Friday, May 31 and Saturday, June 1
The Revivalists
The Revivalists
Some people say luck is the intersection of hard work and opportunity. The Revivalists have been on an unbelievable ride where ten years of tireless hard work was unexpectedly revved up by the wrongly dubbed “overnight success” of the gold-selling #1 single “Wish I Knew You.” Like any enduring band worth its salt, they set their sights on what’s next, buckling down and turning up with an album full of tunes marked by moments of sonic complexity, celebration, and catharsis, taking their songcraft to a whole new level. The striking and soulful lead single “All My Friends” signals this newfound depth and ambition, and is the first taste of their fourth studio album set for release this Fall via Loma Vista Recordings. Driven by swaggering piano, boisterous horns, and bluesy leads, the track introduces this new chapter with confidence and charisma. Representing a vast swath of the country and defying regional pigeonholes, David Shaw’s [lead vocals, guitar] roots are in the Rust Belt, while Zack Feinberg [guitar], Ed Williams [pedal steel guitar] and George Gekas [bass] hail from the Tri-States and Michael Giradot [keyboard, trumpet] and Rob Ingraham [saxophone] from the Southwest. Andrew Campanelli [drums] cut his teeth in the DC scene and newcomer PJ Howard [drums, percussion] made his bones in Chicago. Since forming in New Orleans, the group quietly grinded one gig, song, and album at a time. Seven years in, the lead single “Wish I Knew You” from 2015’s Men Amongst Mountains became a slow-burning hit, racking up more than 200 million streams and ascending to #1 on Adult Alternative as well as Alternative radio where it set a record for most single-week spins ever at the format. A mainstream phenomenon, the song found traction at Hot AC and Top 40 and spent nine weeks on the Billboard Hot 100. The band performed on Today, Jimmy Kimmel LIVE!, Ellen, and Conan amongst acclaim came from the likes of Billboard, USA Today, Entertainment Weekly, Forbes, Flaunt, Nylon, Buzzfeed, Uproxx and more, with Rolling Stone naming them among “10 Artists You Need To Know.” A Billboard Music Awards nomination and two nods at the iHeartRadio Music Awards would follow, capping off three years of back-to-back sold out headline tours.
Umphrey's McGee
Umphrey's McGee
After 18-plus years of performing more than 100 concerts annually, releasing nine studio albums and selling more than 4.2 million tracks online, Umphrey's McGee might be forgiven if they chose to rest on their laurels. But then that wouldn't be consistent with the work ethic demonstrated by the band, which consistently attempts to raise the bar, setting and achieving new goals since forming on the Notre Dame campus in South Bend, Indiana, in 1997. After releasing their eighth studio album, Similar Skin, the first for their own indie label, Nothing Too Fancy (N2F) Music (distributed by RED), the group continued to push the envelope and test the limits. The London Session, was a dream come true for the members having been recorded at the legendary Studio Two at historic Abbey Road. The stealth recording session yielded 10 tracks in a single day, proving once again, the prolific UM waits for no one.

As a follow up to The London Session, the envelope pushing continues with the November 11th release of ZONKEY. Umphrey's McGee has been arranging and performing original mashups live for over eight years. It was only a matter of when, not if, some of those innovative concoctions would find their way into a studio. An album of 12 unique mashups, conceived and arranged by the band, ZONKEY is as seamless as it bizarre, playful as it is razor sharp. Bits and pieces of classic songs are culled from 40-plus years of popular music from 70s Reggae to 80s Pop to 90s Metal and everywhere in between. From Radiohead mashed with Beck, The Weeknd with Fleetwood Mac, Talking Heads with Bob Marley, Metallica with Gorillaz . . . nothing is off limits.

The original Umphrey's McGee played a mix of originals and cover songs, waiting just eight months to release their debut album, the cheekily titled Greatest Hits Volume III. Their initial "proper" recording, Local Band Does OK, came out in 2002, followed shortly afterward by an appearance at the first-ever Bonnaroo in Tennessee, selling more albums than any other band on the bill. The 2007 double album, Live at the Murat, earned a four-star review in Rolling Stone and a Jammy for Best Live Album.

Despite attempts at categorizing UM, the band has devoted its craft to making their devoted followers feel as if they are part of something larger, through such technology-fueled innovations as fan-curated sets, the immersive high-end audio offering, "Headphones & Snowcones," where the pristine sound of the live soundboard mix is piped wirelessly through high-end personal monitor systems and headphones, as well as making every live show since 2005 available via their live music portal UMLive.net. UM were also the first group to launch its own single-artist streaming service.

Finding themselves in London for three shows at the Brooklyn Bowl in June 2014, the idea of recording at Abbey Road was first proposed by Umphrey's producer Manny Sanchez, a notion, as Bayliss told Rolling Stone that seemed as likely as "being asked to give a sermon at the Vatican."

"It wasn't a goal," he explains, "because it never seemed like a possibility." But never to be bound by what seems possible, UM secured a coveted day at the world's most famous recording studio and dove in headfirst.

Twelve hours after first setting foot in Abbey Road Studios, just before midnight, Umphrey's McGee left the historic room with their own new album, The London Session, what Rolling Stone dubs "a historical primer, an evolution story inside 51 minutes."

This November 11th, prepare to get Zonkey'd. An album unlike any previous Umphrey's McGee effort, this unique take on the mash-up concept is yet another example that there aren't many places Umphrey's McGee won't take you.

Umphrey's McGee are more than just a rock band -- through nearly two decades, they have proven to be on the cutting-edge of both music and technology, super-serving their fans through a community that stretches from the campus of Notre Dame to the hallowed halls of Abbey Road.
Greensky Bluegrass
Greensky Bluegrass
After 18 years together, up to 175 shows per year, nearly 1,000 different setlists, six studio albums, and a litany of live releases, Greensky Bluegrass embodies more than just music for members Anders Beck [dobro], Michael Arlen Bont [banjo], Dave Bruzza [guitar], Mike Devol [upright bass], and Paul Hoffman [Mandolin]. Truthfully, it embodies an ironclad creative bond, familial brotherhood, and a lifelong commitment to fans. At this point, it goes without saying the band means everything (and more) to the Kalamazoo, MI bluegrass mavericks.
So, with a wink and a smile, they offer up a cleverly titled seventh full-length, All For Money, in 2019.
Hoffman dispels the obvious first: “Clearly, we aren’t a band all for money. We did it for romantic reasons such as love, catharsis, and because it mattered to us and the listeners. We wanted to have fun with the paradox of the title though. We’re truly blessed and humbled to have our dreams come true and do what we do. However, it would be easy to make decisions based on our needs to eat or the desires of others, but that’s not doing it for love. We love what we do, and we’re grateful for the love we receive in return from the people listening.”
As time goes on, the guys continue to do things for the “right reasons,” and that mindset resonates louder and louder amongst a growing fan base. A live force of nature renowned for bringing rock ‘n’ roll showmanship to high-energy bluegrass, the group has sold out hallowed venues such as Red Rocks Amphitheatre and the legendary Ryman Auditorium in addition to igniting stages everywhere from Bonnaroo and New Orleans Jazz Festival to Austin City Limits and Outside Lands. Their unpredictable performances remain the stuff of legend attracting diehard devotees who typically travel far and wide to experience multiple gigs. In 2014, If Sorrows Swim bowed at #1 on the Billboard Top Bluegrass Albums Chart, while the 2016 follow-up Shouted, Written Down & Quoted cracked the Top 3. Along the way, they have also earned praise from Billboard, AXS, Westword, and more.
On All For Money, Greensky once again aimed to progress. This time around, the musicians kept the show top of mind as they composed the music.
“We have a motto where we want every show to be harder, better, longer, and faster,” admits Hoffman. “With All For Money, I felt like we were serving the performance more by writing and arranging material in a way we would intend to play it on stage. We tried to incorporate a lot of what we already do live, which is different for us in the studio.”
They recorded March-May at Echo Mountain Sound in Asheville, NC. In the studio, they worked with longtime friend Dominic John Davis as producer. According to Hoffman, Davis offered a fresh perspective on “how to balance the studio and concerts.” Amplifying the sonic palette, signatures such as dobro tone, bass grooves, and banjo took the spotlight.
The first single “Do It Alone” feels equally at home on a festival stage as it does blaring through your soundsystem. Backed by a robust groove, the song transforms traditional bluegrass instrumentation into a rich sonic backdrop highlighted by a mandolin awash in a trio of effects as well as rich echoed vocals and emotive lyrics.
I’d been trying to write a windows-down rock ‘n’ roll tune for a while,” explains Hoffman. “I got out an old guitar of mine, re-strung it, and immediately spit the song out. It’s meant to be an anthem. I ask myself, ‘Why do I do it alone?’ It’s because I’ve got a whole room of thousands singing at the top of their lungs with me. Whenever I write something emotional that might be difficult to sing, I’m reminded of the fact the crowd is there. Hopefully, it’s a reminder for other people as well and we all have something to chant together.”
Hot on its heels, the intriguing and irresistible “Murder of Crows” takes flight on kinetic performances as it delivers an emotionally charged message and provocative narrative. “This is a song that Aaron and I wrote about disconnection, drifting apart, loss, and remorse,” Dave Bruzza reveals. “It also touches on a cry for help and how it was not heard in time. A friend told me crows had funerals. He explained that farmers used to nail a crow to the fence or barn door to get rid of them eating the crops. Thee birds would gather, pay their respects, and fly off never to return. It was interesting. I began to think why people disappear in our lives. It came together with the mysterious letter someone received, and it all made sense to turn this into a story.”
Also originally penned by Bruzza, “It’s Not Mine Anymore”’ illustrates the group’s virtuosity with a “metal” spirit. Elsewhere, “Wish I Didn’t Know” hinges on a trance-y Mandolin passage that proves instantly hypnotic, and “Do Harm” taps into an upbeat bounce by way of an an off-kilter rhythm. Meanwhile, the title track spirals into psychedelic territory during a head-spinning two-minute midsection before culminating on an important statement.
“It feels liberating to be honest about it,” he remarks. “With the title track, we were asking more of the listeners than we ever have, but the line ‘If you need a voice, I’m yours friend’ is meant for them.”
In the end, all the right reasons continue to drive Greensky Bluegrass.
“As songwriters and musicians, we have a need for people to be on board, and we’re not just regurgitating the same shit,” he leaves off. “We’re pushing ourselves every time. I hope they want to listen to the record and hear the songs live. I hope they know we’re doing this for us and them.”
Anderson East
Anderson East
There are musicians who call themselves road warriors, and then there's Anderson East. An unflinching, inimitable talent armed with a potent and husky voice, the gritty-blues and-soul-toasting singer has spent the past two years pounding the pavement in the wake of his breakout debut album, 2015's Delilah. It was only fitting then that whatever came next for East would bleed with an intimate and urgent sense of immediacy. "We wanted to present every song as a true performance," the musician says of the stunning and diverse 11 tracks that comprise Encore, the Alabama native's forthcoming new album due January 12 via Low Country Sound/Elektra Records.

The album's title is derived from East's steadfast belief: that every song on his new album must be worthy of closing out one of his notoriously epic live shows. "It was very much about trying to feel live and loose," East says of the writing and recording of Encore as well as its genre-blurring material that blends the boundary-pushing singer's equal-parts love of country-blues ("King For A Day"), soul ("Surrender"), pop ("All On My Mind") and beatific balladry ("Cabinet Door"). Derived from recording sessions over the past year at Nashville's historic RCA Studio A with his longtime producer, Dave Cobb, East's latest LP gives credence to his billing as one of contemporary music's most compelling young artists. Says the singer-songwriter of the sense of accomplishment that surrounds Encore: "You just know when it's right."

For East, stitching together his new album was as much about searching for outside inspiration as drawing from his own well of experience. "I think it's just the nature of wanting to tell stories," the thoughtful, well-articulated singer says of his decision to collaborate with a bevvy of world-renowned artists and songwriters on the album including Chris and Morgane Stapleton ("King For A Day"), Ed Sheeran ("All On My Mind"), Avicii ("Girlfriend") and Natalie Hemby ("This Too Shall Last," complete with an electric guitar assist from Ryan Adams). "You want to hang out with people who have great stories," he adds, noting "Especially people that have amazing craft."

Having spent much of this past year on the road together for the "All-American Road Show," working with the Stapleton's was a virtual inevitability for East. East recalls Chris and Morgane summoning him to their dressing room one evening post-show and the three proceeding to knock out "King For A Day" in short order. "I came there and he had the first couple lines already written," East says of the strutting and wistful tune. "It was midnight, we sat down and maybe 20 minutes later that song was done." He adds with a laugh: "Everybody even managed to leave on time." That particular song, East notes, also confirmed to him he was on the right path for his new project. "OK, we've got something really good here," he recalls thinking at the time. "I can breathe a little deeper now that this thing had been pulled from thin air."

Once back at the studio, having a trusted collaborator like Cobb was essential for East. The singer estimates he wrote 50 songs for Encore, nearly all of which started out as small snippets on his phone's voice recorder app. As a musician who never demo's songs, having a trusted ear like Cobb's helped East to quickly assess whether or not he should cut a particular tune. East describes Cobb as "incredibly vital" and the closest thing he's had to an in-studio bandmate. "We just have this level of trust and comfort with each other," he says of the Grammy-winning producer. "We ultimately want the best for each other and we want the best for the song. We're able to butt heads and get pissy at one another and then finally have worked really hard to get to a place that feels really natural."

If there was any pressure to live up to Delilah's success, East says it was entirely self-imposed. "There was just a lot of internal pressure of trying to make myself happy and impress myself rather than trying to impress other people," he explains. "I knew the development of myself as a performer and our strengths being a live band. I just wanted to make something really musical and something that had substance and that we could stand behind and have room to explore in front of an audience."

East will have plenty of opportunity to do exactly that: next year he'll embark on his largest headline tour to date, "Encore World Tour 2018," that includes stops at NYC's Bowery Ballroom, Nashville's 3rd & Lindsley, L.A.'s El Rey Theatre and San Francisco's The Fillmore. "I'm way more comfortable in my own skin onstage," East says of his evolution as a must-see performer. "And I definitely feel like I'm a far stronger singer than I was compared to when we were making Delilah."

Still, East is nothing if not the decidedly humble type. So much so that despite finding success in recent years, he says he's never been more appreciative for where his journey has taken him. "I'd been making music for ages and nobody cared about any of that before," he says with a laugh. "It's just very humbling. That we've gotten here is pretty sweet."
Rayland Baxter
Rayland Baxter
Thoreau had Walden Pond. Kerouac had Big Sur. Rayland Baxter? He had an old rubber band factory in Franklin, Kentucky, and it suited him just fine. As one of the hardest-touring artists on the road today, Baxter’s spent most of his professional life in transit, but ever since he was a kid, he dreamed of creative seclusion someplace lonely and isolated, somewhere he could sit still and devote his every waking hour to writing without interruption or distraction. When the opportunity finally presented itself in late 2016, the Nashville native pounced.
“I packed everything in my van and moved to Franklin for three months,” says Baxter. “It was the fist time I ever got to be alone and focus solely on songs like that. All I did was write, write, write all day every day. I was obsessed.”
By the time Baxter emerged, he’d penned more than 50 tunes and crafted a detailed blueprint for his spectacular new album, ‘Wide Awake.’ Deftly produced by Butch Walker, the record infuses Baxter’s easygoing, soulful sound with British Invasion melodies and rock and roll swagger, marrying lean, muscular songwriting with adventurous, inventive arrangements. It’s a cutting, insightful collection, one that takes a sardonic view the violence, greed, and division that seem to define the modern American landscape. Rather than point a finger, though, the music holds up a mirror, offering a sober reflection of the times thoughtfully bundled in bright, infectious hooks. There’s no judgment here, only keen observation, and Baxter implicates himself as much as his neighbor through it all.
“This is an album about decision making,” he explains. “It’s about being a human at the crossroads. Do I do good or do I do evil? Do I lie or do I tell the truth? Am I going to be happy or am I going to be sad? All of these questions and emotions are things I see in myself, and they’re the same things I see in everyone else no matter where I go.”
Baxter’s built a career on capturing those sorts of timeless, deeply human sentiments, bringing colorful characters to vivid life with equal parts humor and pathos. His debut album, ‘feathers & fishhooks,’ was a critical hit praised by Interviewfor its “well-worn maturity,” whileNPRdescribed “Yellow Eyes,” the lead single from his 2015 follow-up, ‘Imaginary Man,’ as “close-to-perfect.” Stereogumdubbed the record “an impeccable sophomore break-out,” and Rolling Stonehailed its pairing of “whimsical narrative with often deceptively complex arrangements.” The music earned Baxter festival appearances from Bonnaroo to Newport Folk in addition to tours with an astonishing array of artists, including Jason Isbell, The Lumineers, Kacey Musgraves, The Head and The Heart, Shakey Graves, Lauryn Hill, and Grace Potter.
“The six months leading up to the release of ‘Imaginary Man,’ that was the first time I really started playing electric guitar and performing with a band,” says Baxter. “We did my first headline run and toured that album for a year-and-a-half, and the experience really opened up this whole new sound for me. It helped me figure out more of who I was as an artist and a songwriter and a traveler and a human being.”

It was with that newfound sense of self that Baxter entered Thunder Sound, the abandoned rubber band factory-turned-studio in the cornfields of Kentucky that would become his home for three months of intensive soul searching and songwriting.
“I blanketed the windows so no one could see inside,” he explains. “I laid a mattress down next to an old Wurlitzer so I had somewhere to sleep. I had a guitar, a desk with a lamp and some paper and pencils, and that was it. For fifteen hours a day, I wrote.”
When it came time to record his mountain of new songs, Baxter relocated to Santa Monica, California, where he wrangled an all-star studio band that included Dr. Dog’s Erick Slick on drums, Butch Walker on bass, Cage The Elephant’s Nick Bockrath on guitar, and piano wizard Aaron Embry (Elliott Smith, Brian Eno) on keys. A producer and artist equally at home working with massive pop stars and indie stalwarts, Walker immediately embraced Baxter’s vision for the album, and the result is a sunny and altogether charming collection. Scratch beneath the surface, though, and you’ll find it’s populated by a cast of characters who project a vision of the good life as they struggle to keep it all together behind closed doors. On the punchy ‘Casanova,’ the singer reckons with debts he knows he’ll never be able to repay,while the volatile “Amelia Baker” charts the narrator’s descent into near-madness as he pines for a starlet perpetually out of reach.
“We have this society where we’re obsessed with celebrity and living on the top of the mountain,” says Baxter. “But what’s at the top? Maybe it’s a lonely place to wake up.”
Late 2016 was a particular tumultuous time in the country, and though Baxter did his best to isolate himself from the outside world while he wrote, it was inevitable that some of the chaos would seep in. On album opener “Strange American Dream,” a chiming piano and spare Motown groove give way to lush harmonies and unexpected melodic twists as Baxter sings, “I close my eyes and realize that I’m alive inside this strange American dream.” Meanwhile, the soaring “79 Shiny Revolvers” finds him reflecting, “you really wanna save the world, man / well, I wanna save it, too / we can blow ’em away / the American way.”
While ‘Wide Awake’ offers plenty of broad, wide-angle musings, some of its most arresting moments arrive bundled inside deeply personal memories and snapshots. The heartfelt “Everything To Me” is a tender tribute to family (Baxter’s father Bucky, who played pedal steel with Bob Dylan and Ryan Adams among others, contributes to the record), and the laidback “Let It All Go Man” is a reminder that there’s beauty in simply being alive.
“I actually started that song two years ago on a trip to South America,” says Baxter. “I was sitting on the porch of a house in this little town in Colombia, and I was all alone playing a gut string classical guitar, just staring out at the ocean and the beach in the middle of the night. It made me realize how much unnecessary stuff we hold on to, all the grinding away we do chasing success and money and missing the big picture. It made me realize what an incredibly beautiful gift it is to be human.”
That empty South American beach may have been a world away from the rubber band factory in Kentucky, but for Baxter, the effect was the same. The solitude offered a chance to observe, to reflect, to grow, to appreciate, and most importantly, to write.
Aaron Lee Tasjan
Aaron Lee Tasjan
Young Valley
Young Valley
Ideas had grown cold about forming a "back-up country" band for frontman, Zach Lovett. "Z" had become a household name in the Mississippi singer-songwriter conversations and was wanting to explore some new options and considered the idea of having a band to accompany his songs. With the frazzling out of their ensemble based Mississippi Delta folk-grass band, Dandy & the Lions, - Zach, Spencer Thomas, and Carson Braymer were caught in a similar situation. After finding their way back to Jackson, the 3 piece finally rounded out their sound with the homecoming of guitar player and Zach's brother, Dylan - who was living in Texas. With him, came newest addition Chris Hassler after Braymer's departure. What started out as playing Zach originals or his collaborations with Spencer, fused into a swapping and sharing of songs and creativity that, combined with their influences and sense of home, and their natural alt-country sound (with a lot of weird nights, thoughtful minds, and Budweiser) - Young Valley was formed.



Since then, they try and stay on the road or spend time in the studio and they have had some good times with some real good people - having shared the stage with Lucero, The Weeks, The Mulligan Brothers, Water Liars, Alanna Royale, Futurebirds, Phosphorescent, and Adam Faucett.
Venue Information:
Cathead Distillery
422 South Farish St
Jackson, MS, 39201