Grayson Capps + Sarah Peacock
Presented by Ardenland

Grayson Capps

Sarah Peacock

Duling HallJacksonMS
Under 18 With Guardian
See Grayson Capps & Sarah Peacock LIVE at Duling Hall on Saturday, April 11th!

Ticket Information:

Doors open at 7:00 PM, and the show begins at 8:00 PM.

General admission tickets are $10 advance and $15 day of show.

General Admission tickets are standing room only. First come, first served.

There will be an upcharge of $5 for persons under the age of 21.

About Grayson Capps:

Grayson Capps' fifth studio album, The Lost Cause Minstrels finds the Mobile, Alabama-based singer-songwriter coming of age. This doesn't mean, however, that his oft-unholy tales of the Southern Gothic have lost any sting. Quite the contrary, Capps' Tao-tinged, philosophical reflections—revealed deep inside songs shuddering with spit, stomp and snarl—are as potent as ever. Listen no further than the tracks: "Highway 42," "No Definitions" and "Rock N Roll" to hear that Capps cedes no quarter. It's just that this time his bark and bite is more conciliatory towards the unanswered questions mucking up the universe, while country soul-tinged textures and gospel harmonies ease the raw edges.

Occasionally, even a celebratory mood prevails like the horn-fueled romp "Ol' Slac," an ode the rebirth of the Mobile, Alabama Mardi Gras; or "Coconut Moonshine," a character sketch based on Mr. Jim who inhabits the hallowed roadside barbecue joint in Ocean Springs, Mississippi.

As well, two rare, but classic, American roots' numbers are born again here: Taj Mahal's country-blues paen "Annie's Lover" and Richard “Rabbit” Brown's jaunty "Jane's Alley Blues," (the original recording preserved on Harry Smith's Anthology of American Folk Music).

Grayson Capps' real life situation has evolved since his previous release Rott 'n' Roll, and those developments are felt in both the album's sound and spirit. In 2010, he dissolved his band The Stumpknockers, re-assembling a new cast of musicians, fittingly dubbed The Lost Cause Minstrels. The line-up features a who's who of the finest players on the Gulf Coast music scene, including Corky Hughes on guitars, Chris Spies on keys, Christian Grizzard on bass and John Milham on drums.

In the middle of recording the album, Capps moved back to Alabama where he was born and raised. He'd been residing in Nashville since 2007 after leaving his longtime New Orleans' home following Hurricane Katrina.

Additionally, Capps co-produced the effort with his partner and Grammy Award-winning engineer/producer Trina Shoemaker (Queens of the Stone Age, Dylan Leblanc, Sheryl Crow).

All of these factors coalesce into a collection of songs timeless in their pursuit of truth yet well aware of how hard the truth is to find in these times. The Lost Cause Minstrels is the highly anticipated next chapter from one of the finest Southern troubadours of the day.

Grayson Capps first discovered music in Alabama where he was born and raised. His father and friends would sit around the house getting drunk, telling stories and strumming acoustic guitars. They’d run down songs by Hank Williams, Tom T. Hall, Glenn Campbell and Woodie Guthrie to name but a few. The idealism of those “Cannery Row” experiences would come to define his outlook on the world. Heading off to Tulane University as a theater major on scholarship, Grayson also took up playing music. He’d form two bands that would have moderate national success—The House Levelers and Stavin’ Chain— receiving acclaim in publications like Spin and USA Today and opening shows for Keith Richards, The Replacements and Crowded House. After graduating college, he took to squatting with friends in a string of abandoned houses on the outskirts of the Big Easy, stealing electricity, growing a garden and busking for whatever money was needed. Grayson recounts those times on a number of songs off his debut album, If You Knew My Mind. One of those memories even finds its way onto Rott ‘N’ Roll in the form of “Ike.

”Hailing from South Alabama and spending over a decade in New Orleans, revered singer-songwriter Grayson Capps has found listeners the world over enthralled by his stinging tales of the Southern Gothic. In his own words, he explains: "I write songs which have the voice of dead prophets masquerading as town drunks screaming 'look at us we're pretty, too!'"

Over the course of four critically acclaimed studio albums and cameo appearance in the Golden Globe Award-nominated film A Love Song For Bobby Long, one will find a stunning depth to his discography, authenticating Grayson Capps as a rare American gem, equal parts country singer, bluesman, rock star, philosopher and poet. As Jambase recently declared, "New Orleans' marvel Grayson Capps is alive and well and slowly building one of the most phenomenal songbooks in America today. If ever there were a cat primed to pick up where Lowell George and John Prine have left off, it's Capps."

Grayson Capps is currently touring the world in support of his new album, The Lost Cause Minstrels, on the Brooklyn record label Royal Potato Family. He will have two songs featured in the upcoming Screen Gems film Straw Dogs starring James Marsden, Kate Bosworth and Alexander Skarsgård.

Grayson Capps first discovered music in Alabama where he was born and raised. His father and friends would sit around the house getting drunk, telling stories and strumming acoustic guitars. They'd run down songs by Hank Williams, Tom T. Hall, Glenn Campbell and Woodie Guthrie to name but a few. The idealism of those "Cannery Row" experiences would come to define his outlook on the world. Heading off to Tulane University as a theater major on scholarship, Grayson also took up playing music. He'd form two bands that would have moderate national success--The House Levelers and Stavin' Chain--receiving acclaim in publications like Spin and USA Today and opening shows for Keith Richards, The Replacements and Crowded House. After graduating college, he took to squatting with friends in a string of abandoned houses on the outskirts of the Big Easy, stealing electricity, growing a garden and busking for whatever money was needed. Grayson recounts those times on a number of songs off his debut album, If You Knew My Mind. One of those memories even finds its way onto Rott ‘N’ Roll in the form of "Ike."

With both bands ultimately breaking up, Grayson began performing as a solo artist. It was around this time that the young filmmaker Shainee Gabel (who befriended Grayson through a previous project they'd worked on together) discovered his father's unpublished novel Off Magazine Street. She fell in love with the story and set out to turn it into a film. Through a confluence of events, the movie A Love Song For Bobby Long, starring John Travolta and Scarlett Johansson, was born. Grayson wrote four songs for the film, including the title track. He made a cameo appearance, as well. The story was based upon those early years with his father's friends back in Alabama. Bobby Long was, indeed, a real person. He died unceremoniously in a Johnson City, Tennessee V.A. hospital. All these years later, Grayson saw Bobby's life memorialized by Hollywood. Life as art or art as life?

Grayson Capps signed with Hyena Records just prior to the film's premier. He simultaneously released his aforementioned debut album, If You Knew My Mind, to rave reviews from publications like No Depression, Harp and American Songwriter. He set out touring, building his audience with marathon live shows that married his keen sense of storytelling to the glory of Southern rock. He made it to Europe for a string of shows. To this day his audience continues to swell on the other side of the Atlantic as witnessed by his recent sold out performance at The Paradiso in Amsterdam.

While on the road in August 2005, Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans and changed everything. With the city in flux and the demands for a new album pressing down on him, Grayson moved to a converted farmhouse in Franklin, Tennessee with his longtime companion Trina Shoemaker (who co-produces Rott ‘N’ Roll) and his son Waylon. He recorded the album Wail & Ride. More touring followed, including performances at Bonnaroo and The New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival. He'd also release a dusty collection of acoustic tracks from 2002 called Songbones as a limited edition set.

All of this leads to Rott ‘N’ Roll, the definitive Grayson Capps document to date. Cut at his home studio in Franklin, it's the first album to solely feature his band, The Stumpknockers. Its predecessor, Wail & Ride, presented Grayson as a singer-songwriter, delicately framing his songs with pristine sound and a mix of studio musicians alongside his band-mates. Rott ‘N’ Roll, on the other hand, is about an attitude, a mood and a viewpoint, warts and all. Everything was tracked live and much of the final product is culled from first takes. The band, featuring Tommy “Ol’ Grover” MacLuckie on lead guitar, Josh Kerin on bass and John Milham on drums, would spend days at Grayson's farmhouse rehearsing during the afternoons and hanging out around a bonfire in his backyard at night. If the spirit moved them, they'd cut a track, overdub a guitar part, record a drunken chorus of rednecks who found their way to the sessions from all points south: "Gran Maw Maw" and "Big Ol' Woman" being case in point. If they weren't feeling inspired, they'd wander around the mountain that serves as Grayson's backyard, quite literally bonding with the Native American spirits. Rott ‘N’ Roll’s second song "Arrowhead" paints a picture of this idyllic setting.

Throughout the 13 tracks on Rott ‘N’ Roll, the listener gets a front row seat to the subversion. "Big Black Buzzard" circles with wicked hill country fervor that could make R.L. Burnside run for cover cover. "The Sun Don't Shine On Willy" is informed by Grayson’s gift for the Southern Gothic, with lyrics like: "He looks like old Boo Radley, he’s pale and his veins are blue, now he looks like one of them Hadleys after they’ve been drunk a month or two." Yet, there are also moments of clarity and tenderness. "Guitar" is perhaps Grayson's most autobiographical song to date. "Going Back To The Country," while full of hiss and swagger, addresses the search for truth and simplicity in a fast changing, often deceptive modern world. "The Fear Fruit Bearing Tree" is a biting piece of poetry that speaks truth to power in these times of corporate greed and government fear mongering. "Sock Monkey," marks guitarist Tommy MacLuckie's songwriting debut with a blast of country punk absurdity.

Having drawn comparisons over his last few albums to the likes of Tom Waits, Townes Van Zandt and Drive By Truckers, to name but a few, Rott ‘N’ Roll proves Grayson Capps an artist equally singular in vision as those to whom he’s compared. He doesn’t always paint the prettiest pictures or offer a gleamy white smile, but he does reach down deep to remind us of our own humanity. Grayson’s own words illuminate it best: “How many times must it be said? Though blood runs blue, you still think it’s red, because that’s how it appears when it hits oxygen. Our life is an illusion, and we create the confusion, so take a dose of seclusion to dilute the delusion. And hope that it’s not in vein that we look into the spheres of the fear-fruit bearing tree before we eat again.”

About Sarah Peacock:

American history is blood-stained with the dehumanization of entire communities. Casting her own harrowing spell, singer-songwriter Sarah Peacock draws parallels between current events and the 1692 Salem Witch Trials with the title song to her new record, Burn the Witch (March 27, 2020). Finger-picking guitar work cleanses the throat as her voice swells to mimic the havoc strewn through time, as well as present-day strife along our southern border. Such raw intensity boils over onto the rest of the 11-track record, and while her style is not easily defined, her storytelling prowess is irrefutably potent and unnerving.

“Hopefully, this song inspires people to take a look at what’s happening in our world today and how we abuse people,” she says of the song, which is delivered as a “catalyst for hope.”

Peacock has a bedeviling way about her, particularly in the way she harvests such influences as Brandi Carlile and Heart. She even filters heavy metal band Metallica through a rootsy, acoustic lens to emerge with a silky, sticky musical web of her very own. “Keep Quiet” slithers from her bones in a similar sinister fashion, twisting her lyrical mechanisms even tighter, while “Mojave” flourishes with a vibrantly polished hook. Her voice always rises to the occasion -- switching between various styles as effortlessly as a chameleon.

Firm in her belief to use her platform for social and cultural change, the shift occurred after her tour bus burned to the ground in 2016. Then on a four-month tour, weaving up the west coast, she and her crew stopped for a quick bite to eat. Their generator caught fire and the blaze consumed nearly everything aboard.

“After the fire, I signed with a Nashville label when I came home from the tour. I did two records for American Roots Records prior to parting ways with them in the fall of 2018. There was Beauty in the Ashes (2017) and then Hot Sheet Motel (2018). I think the connection piece and synergy between the bus fire and Burn the Witch was that the bus was a pivotal moment where I realized people really were listening. The fans showed up for me when I was ready to quit, and that made me internalize (probably for the first time) that the world was actually paying attention. I started writing differently. I wrote like the fate of the social climate depended on it. Burn the Witch is what happened after really letting the juices of that experience and those last two records soak in. It’s about the music, the songs, and the power they have to plant a seed of change.”

Burn the Witch is a brawny, life-affirming set that digs into themes of perseverance, overcoming personal struggles, finding redemption in the ashes and what freedom should feel like. “The Cool Kids” recalls being bullied in school and the idea that “hurting people tend to hurt people,” she says in hindsight. “I feel sorry for all those kids who picked on me.”

“I remember Billy Shane / Got beat up ‘cause he was gay / There’s worse things than sticks and stones / Bones will heal, but a heart just won’t,” she sings. Such a raw lyric is one of many essential pillars to Peacock’s latest opus, also accentuated with songs like “House of Bones” (“It’s a hell of a thing to do / Carve your heart out with a spoon”), the rain-soaked “The One” and “Take You High,” which offers a welcome reprieve of optimism and warmth.

A product of the Atlanta suburbs, growing up in the town of Lawrenceville, Peacock did what most youths do: she performed in the church as part of band and choir, as well as in stage musicals in high school. Forbidden to listen to any secular music, it wasn’t until much later that she sought out popular music like the Beatles, Led Zeppelin, Queen, Fleetwood Mac, Johnny Cash, Linda Ronstadt and country icons Dolly and Reba.

In 2001, she left for Belmont University in Nashville to study commercial music. Her mid-20s evolution directly stemmed from flipping through catalogs of Top 40 country and pop-rock, while still drawing upon a heavily contemporary Christian music songwriting foundation. Her discoveries in rock ‘n' roll music soon fused with her own burgeoning craft, and she later spent a few years teaching at a music school for kids in Atlanta -- helping to build a curriculum that spanned ‘60s and ‘80s music to the present.

Meanwhile, as her musical endeavors expanded, she underwent a vital personal transformation.

“A huge factor for me in coming to grips with my faith and sexuality was that I discovered the progressive Christian community during this time,” she recalls. “I learned that what I was told to believe about the Bible and the LGBT community isn’t exactly what the Bible really says when you read it with the full scope of the original text and a full understanding of the social and religious culture of the time. I was told that you couldn’t be gay and a Christian. Discovering that God really did make me who I am on purpose and learning that He didn’t want me to change gave me the freedom to be who I was more comfortably.”

An active touring musician since 2005, she met a smorgasbord of people who showed her the full breadth of what love and compassion meant.

“I was finding these people opening their homes to me and preparing meals for me and just loving me,” she remembers. “They were good, solid, generous, kind people, and that really opened up my viewpoint, not to mention in a parallel way, I was discovering how to reconcile my faith and sexuality.” It took Peacock a good seven or eight years “to come to terms with and live comfortably in my own skin and find my voice and sense of belonging, as a woman in the business,” she says.

Causing even more emotional friction for her was an ongoing mental health battle. “I was feeling like who I was was so innately wrong that I simply didn’t want to exist anymore,” she says. “Having to come to terms with it all, there was no alternative for me. I wouldn’t be here today if I didn’t invest in personal growth and in a spiritually-heightened awareness.”

At the time of the bus fire in 2016, everything came to a head. It was a turning point not only for her personal development but for her music as well. Burn the Witch is Peacock at her most vulnerable, and yet there rises a great strength within her songwriting. She’s unafraid to confront social issues of being a queer woman in 2019, bullying, and displaying unconditional compassion. “Hold Me in Your Heart” is an astonishing acoustic-rooted moment and quite a wallop of a performance to bookend what will undoubtedly be one of 2020's most important releases.

These 11 songs seek to uproot what we think we know about the world. Peacock works her magic across every single moment, each syllable diligently carrying its weight and heart. The music is expertly packaged and delivered with a sense of urgency while never feeling heavy-handed or exploitative. Her eighth album, Burn the Witch, is about truth and understanding of humanity, and Peacock will not back down until the whole world is listening.

Learn more about Grayson Capps below:

Official Website

Facebook

Learn more about Sarah Peacock below:

Official Website

Facebook

Venue Information:
Duling Hall
622 Duling Ave
Jackson, MS, 39216